Cookie

Cookies

It’s Week 2 of our food-related Film Term Friday (say that fast three times!). This week’s word goes down well with a cup of tea, missus. It’s “cookie”, but not the sort you dip in your cuppa. For filmmakers, “Cookie” is short for cucoloris (or, variously, cuculoris, kookaloris, cookaloris or cucalorus). A cucoloris is a large piece of card or metal with patterns cut in it. It’s designed to be held in front of a large light source, so that it casts distinct shadows on the set. It’s often used to make it look like the shadow that falls on an inside wall when the sun shines through leafy branches. If you’ve ever watched a film noire detective movie, the shadow of the blinds that falls on the wall of the PI’s office was almost certainly cast by a cookie.

What’s the origin of the word “cucoloris”? Nobody really knows.

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Recent Posts

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An adorable little Film Term Friday entry for you this week. Our word is “woof!”.

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Despite what you might be thinking, this isn’t a term for a petulant actor who isn’t getting everything his own way (although it works in that context, too).

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